For the best experience viewing this site you need the Flash Player installed.
2013_jill_elijah_noah

Fullscreen


2015_kaminski_julia

Photographer Index

_Jett_Nicholas 2015_kaminski_julia

Melissa Jill
Melissa Jill Photography
www.melissajill.com

Elijah & Noah

Noah is now 12, Elijah is 11. Though they are brothers, though the disorder they both live with is called by the same name, Noah and Elijah's strengths and their challenges are vastly different.

Noah is the brain wizard. Let's say his mother's cell phone rings. Only the number shows in the display screen. No name. BUT, the number is also in his FATHER'S cell phone. In the contact list. WITH the name. Noah will then, seeing only a number, recognize the caller anyway (based on his memory of his father's contact list), and act as his mother's official caller ID.
Noah also enjoys the wonders of other modern technology -- emailing for example. If Noah gets his hands on an email address, be it his mother's friend in book club, his father's business partners, or my husband's for example, he will spend a portion of the day sending each of them this simple message:

"Haha ok man yeh love you."

And another email.

"Haha ok man yeh love you."

And another email.

"Haha ok man yeh love you."

All within 3 minutes. Noah is also very helpful with his younger brother. For example, on Elijah's birthday, Noah opened all the presents. Very helpful. He enjoys making up games they can both play like Jump Off the Bookshelf, one of their favorites when they were younger.

Elijah has a different set of talents. He is the escape artist. Unusually strong for his age, he has scaled the impossible brick wall in his backyard and ended up in the neighbor's pool more than once... and never with clothing. Elijah is not one for clothing. He prefers (or insists) on being in his most natural state, most of the time. And it really is no surprise that he enjoys the pool, since his other favorite past time is watching Michael Phelps win the gold medal on video tape over, and over, and over again. Standing, staring, watching the long smooth motion and the powerful splashing, and the back and forth and back and forth. No matter what mistakes Michael Phelps may make in his life, Elijah will never lose faith.
Elijah is also very stealthy. You see, with Autism came a variety of extremely restrictive food allergies. The child can basically eat vegetables plus a few additional items. Understandably, he gets frustrated when others are eating food that he cannot. Because he does not speak, he does not express his frustration with words, instead, he DOES something about it. One afternoon at a McDonald's Playland the brothers were out for a play date. As their mother visited with some of the other moms, Elijah zoned in on a small girl on the other side of the playground enjoying a Chicken McNugget. Desiring a Chicken McNugget for himself, but knowing he certainly wouldn't be GIVEN one, he went into stealth mode; he snuck up to the little girl's table, waited until the adults were looking the other way, grabbed the nugget out of her little box, shoved it in his mouth, and disappeared behind the slide... all in the blink of an eye. When the little girl cried out "THAT BOY TOOK MY NUGGET," her parents didn't believe her. Elijah's mother however, calmly stood, took her sons by the hand, said goodbye to her friends, and took the boys home.

The stories could go on...

Natalie, mother of Noah and Elijah
Mesa, AZ


2015_kaminski_julia